CHIS data illustrate how place and race matters

Why Place and Race Matter

An African American baby in the predominantly low-income neighborhood of West Oakland is 1.5 times more likely to be born premature than a white infant in the Oakland Hills, 7 times more likely to be born into poverty, and 4 times more likely to have parents with only a high school education.  These and other alarming statistics, including data from the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), are featured in a new report from PolicyLink and The California Endowment that illustrates the growing divide between those born into neighborhoods with safe parks, clean air, access to nutritious foods, and neighbors who look out for you — and those without these essential building blocks of a healthy environment.

Read the report: Why Place & Race Matter

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